miércoles, 16 de noviembre de 2016

Convocatoria al XX Encuentro de la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México (versión inglés)

“El milagro de San Toribio Romo,” by María Palacios.  Photo by Consuelo Velasco Montoya

Call for Proposals
Claremont Graduate University and the
Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México
(Network of Religion Researchers in Mexico)
Invite thematic papers session proposals for the Twentieth Annual Meeting of Rifrem to be held, May 31, June 1 and 2, 2017 at Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, California, USA):
Religion and migration in greater Mexico
Background discussion
The long-held expectation for religion’s eclipse in the shadow of an encroaching and totalizing secularized modernity has faltered in the face of the phenomenon’s resiliency and diversification. In the case of Mexico, resilient and renewed indigenous religious traditions, resilient and new cults of saints, an expanded pluralism (including growing rates of non-Catholic and non-religious adscription), and perennial, new, and intensified public protagonism over definitions of marriage and the family continue to invite focused and comparative scholarly research in a country that is comprised of 32 federated entities, many distinct regions, that registers 62 spoken indigenous languages, and that has a complicated history of Church-State relations. Scholars are challenged to precisely analyze moving targets of popular religiosity in variegated social, economic, political, ethnic, and geographical contexts.
The premier forum for scholarly exchange concerning these and other topics has been the annual meetings of the Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México – RIFREM (Network of Religion Researchers of Mexico). Over the course of the past two decades, members of this flagship association have produced an impressive body of scholarship in monographs, edited books, journal articles, documentaries, etc. They have also served as expert interlocutors for determining methodologies and categories in the federal Census, and have produced the most authoritative surveys of religion in Mexico. Given Mexico’s proximity to the United States, Central America, and the imbrication of religious, ethnic, and migratory phenomena, RIFREM scholars have also studied religious phenomena in “greater” Mexico (México de Afuera), examining the transnational dimensions of religious practice and identity in old and new circuits of labor migration, among Central American migrants, and within indigenous communities of origin, settlement, and return. The geographical dispersion has occurred in tandem with a growing awareness of the contingency of established analytical rubrics and categories imported from the global North; thus, RIFREM has also served as a productive site for the re-thinking of theoretical and methodological questions in transnational contexts.
Claremont Graduate University is pleased to announce that it will serve as the host of the Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México’s Twentieth Annual Meeting, to be held May 31 through June 2, 2017, on CGU’s Claremont, California campus (forty miles east of Los Angeles, the second largest city of Mexican-origin population). This historic gathering in southern California represents a valuable opportunity for continued scholarly exchange between scholarly guilds in both countries and elsewhere in Latin America. (In 2006, RIFREM celebrated its tenth annual meeting at Arizona State University.) It also marks CGU’s institutional shift in the direction of research and teaching in Latino and Latin American religions.   
Religion and Migration in Greater Mexico
This fortuitous institutional and scholarly convergence suggests an organizing theme for RIFREM’s Twentieth Annual Meeting: Religion and Migration in Greater Mexico. Indeed, as noted, the theme reflects ongoing scholarly interest within RIFREM in, for example, the transnational growth and agency of such religious minorities as Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, Seventh-Day Adventists, and Pentecostals, and in indigenous communities’ transnational activism against neoliberal processes and their defense of traditional ways (usos y costumbres). Importantly, the theme affords an opportunity for a ninety-year critical retrospective on the uneven fate of the religion variable in migration studies. Notably, the foundational study (1926-1929) undertaken by anthropologist Manuel Gamio, queried deeply the question of religious practice and belief among Mexican immigrants in the United States. The Life Story of the Mexican Immigrant (University of Chicago, 1931) wove the religion thread throughout the myriad histories of the study’s subjects, while the more analytical volume, Mexican Immigration to the United States (University of Chicago, 1930) included a chapter on religion. The variable also captured the attention of Gamio translator and collaborator Robert Redfield. Similarly, the incipient field of sociology at the University of Southern California sought to map the religious field of Mexican Los Angeles; the several theses overseen by Emory Bogardus even managed to capture traces of an emerging Pentecostalism. The religion variable’s eclipse in subsequent scholarship on Mexican migration is understandable in light of prevailing disciplinary constraints and ideological assumptions in early Chicano/Latino Studies. The last decade of research, however, has cast new light on the intersection of religion and migration, drawing attention to the persistence and portability of religious identities and practices among migrating populations and migration-tied communities. To take just one example, the axis that runs from Oaxaca state’s Tehuantepec Isthmus through Mexico City to western Sinaloa and northwestern Baja California states and from there to California and Oregon represents an identifiable corridor of new labor migration (since 1960), “Oaxacalifornia”, whose geographic and chronological parameters (versus the more diffuse migration and settlement patterns of earlier Mexican migration waves) present opportunities for manageable and focused research on religion and migration. The study of religious transnationalism can assess, among other things: the influence of technology and media; the catalytic and reinforcing role of monetary and symbolic (religious) remittances and the agency of migrants in communities of origin; the relative weight of missionary strategies vs. migrant tactics; power relations between transnationally tied congregations; and the potential of U.S. Latino congregations and parishes to serve as alternative public squares for a population that has been increasingly criminalized and pushed out of the public arena and public institutions of the U.S., and, alternatively, to serve as incubators of social and political leadership to be leveraged and exercised in communities of origin in Mexico. Clearly, religion continues to matter in “greater” Mexico, in the borderlands, and in the alternative public spaces shaped and inhabited by subaltern actors, spaces within which they articulate notions of cultural citizenship. Indeed, recent historical scholarship has illumined this, demonstrating the longstanding force and impact of Mexican religious actors, history, and developments on Mexican American communities during the long course of the twentieth century (e.g., exilic Cristero prelates and priests in San Antonio and Los Angeles; transnational Protestant ministers; Pentecostal borderlands solidarity and culture; cooperative episcopal structures, Chicano and Central American appropriations of Mesoamerican motifs, and, of course, intra-ethnic tensions). According to recent surveys, 23% of U.S. church-goers are Roman Catholic; Latinos constitute 40% of Catholics, and are highly represented within the Charismatic Renewal. Of the 153 million (52%) Protestants in the U.S., 7% (10 million) are Latinos, with Puerto Rican and Central American-origin populations demonstrating significantly higher Pentecostal rates than Mexican-origin ones.
Call for Thematic Papers Sessions
The meeting organizers invite proposals for thematic papers sessions (around the organizing theme and other themes), which will then form the basis for a subsequent call for individual papers. The following list of possible topics is not an exhaustive one, and may be considered in comparative focus. The Organizing Committee will welcome, of course, topics in the general and broad study of the religious phenomenon.
-       National and Ethnic Identity and Religion
-       Religion, Migration and Transnationalism
-       Religion and the Borderlands
-       Religion and Neoliberalism
-       Religion and the Environment
-       Religion and Fine Arts
-       Religion, Film and Theatre
-       Religion and Gender
-       Religion and Queer, Intersexual and Trans Identities
-       Virtual Religion and Millenials
-       Religion and Sex
-       Religion and Violence
-       Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Religious Social Scientific Research
-       Theology and Religious Studies: Comparative Institutional Configurations
-       Church-State Relations and Tensions
-       Musical and Sonic Dimensions in Religion
-       New Binational Religious Movements
-       Indigenous Religious Practices
-       Comparative Guadalupanismos
-       Pachuco, Cholo, and Chicana Religious Expressions
-       Chicana/o and Centroamericana/o Mesoamerican Appropriations
-       Central American Religious Identities
-       Cults of Saints and Diasporic Communities
-       Conversion and Apostasy
-       Xenophobia, Repatriation, and Religion
-       Liturgical, Musical and Ritual Practices
-       Conversos and Messianism
-       Muslim Identities
-       Thaumaturgical Practices
-       Congregational Studies
-       Spanish-Mexican Borderlands: From Bolton to Anzaldúa
-       Protestant Quincentenary
-       “Made in the U.S.A.” Religions (Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Adventists, Pentecostals)
-       “Made in Mexico” Religions (Luz del Mundo, Buen Pastor)
Requirements
Proposals for Thematic Papers Sessions should include
1) Proposed Title
2) Name of proposer/organizer
3) Email
4) Institution
5) Description: Should include the theoretical basis and implications for the proposal and be no longer than one-half page.
Proposals should be sent rifrem2017@gmail.com.
Note: The meeting logistics may allow for several consecutive time slots for a thematic papers session, depending on the number of individual paper proposals accepted. The format of the sessions will include papers delivered in Spanish and English (or bilingual).
Key Dates
The date for receipt of thematic panels/sessions proposals is November 21, 2016. Whereupon the local organizing committee and the RIFREM steering committee will select the thematic papers sessions for the Twentieth Meeting, choosing sessions that reflect the conference organizing theme as well as other themes of interest to the academic community. These will serve to establish the contours of a subsequent (second) Call for Proposals for individual papers, to be issued on November 28, 2016. The due date for the individual papers is December 21, 2016. The Organizing Committee will expedite official acceptances of the thematic papers sessions and individual papers, in order to allow participants sufficient time to secure U.S. travel visas.
Conference Site, Accommodations, Travel, etc.
Claremont Graduate University is a member of the Claremont Colleges Consortium, a cluster of five undergraduate colleges and several graduate ones, including a seminary, the Claremont School of Theology. CGU’s School of Arts and Humanities houses the University’s Religion Department, a unit with strengths in the areas of Philosophy, Theology, Biblical Studies, History, Women’s Studies, American Religion, Mormon Studies, and a new focus on Latino and Latin American Religions.
The City of Claremont is nestled beneath the San Gabriel mountain range and adjoins several suburban cities in eastern Los Angeles and western San Bernardino counties (Pomona, La Verne, San Dimas, Ontario, Upland, Montclair, and Rancho Cucamonga). The area counts a considerable number of hotels with several levels of accommodations, and is served by the nearby Ontario International Airport. Other regional airports include Los Angeles International Airport, Burbank International Airport, John Wayne Airport (Orange County), and San Diego International Airport. Attendees can also travel within Mexico to the Tijuana International Airport in order to cross over into the United States; whereupon they can travel by rail or bus to Claremont (generally via Los Angeles). The organizers will provide detailed travel, lodging, and other information, as this becomes available.
Further Information
For further information, please contact Haley Thomas (haley.thomas@cgu.edu) or Daniel Ramírez (daniel.ramirez@cgu.edu). 
Coordinadores Generales
Dr. Daniel Ramírez (CGU)
Lic. Haley Thomas (CGU)
Comité de recepción de trabajos
Mtro. Felipe Agredano (East Los Angeles College)
Dr. Lloyd Barba (Williams College)
Comité de organización logística y enlace regional
Melissa Fitzpatrick (CGU)
Mtra. Milca Montañez (Fuller Theological Seminary)
Mtro. Felipe Agredano (East Los Angeles College)
Mtro. Jesús Martínez (University of California Santa Cruz)
Lic. Annette Cortez
María Palacios

Consejo de la Rifrem
Renée de la Torre (Ciesas, Occidente)
Cristina Gutiérrez Zuñiga (Coljal)
Alberto Hernández (Colef)
Antonio Higuera Bonfil (UQRoo)
Luis Rodolfo Morán (UdeG)
María Eugenia Patiño (UAA)
Genaro Zalpa (UAA)
Olga Odgers (Colef)
Carlos Garma (UAM, Iztapalapa)
Ariel Corpus (UNAM)
Patricia Fortuny (Ciesas, Peninsular)
Nahayeilli Juárez Huet (Ciesas, Peninsular)
Luis Jesús Martínez (UATx)

sábado, 5 de noviembre de 2016

Convocatoria al XX Encuentro de la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México

“El milagro de San Toribio Romo,” by María Palacios.  Photo by Consuelo Velasco Montoya
Convocatoria
Claremont Graduate University y la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México
Convocan a presentar propuestas de mesa de trabajo para el XX Encuentro de la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México, a realizarse los días 31 de mayo, 1 y 2 de junio de 2017, en el campus de Claremont  Graduate University (Claremont, California, EUA), con el tema general:
“Religión y migración en México y en México de afuera”
Presentación
A pesar de las expectativas sobre el inevitable eclipse de la religión a la sombra de una modernidad secularizante, el fenómeno religioso perdura y se diversifica. En el caso de México, las tradiciones indígenas religiosas se renuevan, los cultos de santos siguen creciendo aún allende la frontera, el pluralismo religioso sigue ampliándose (las crecientes tasas de identidades no-católicas y de adscripción no-religiosa siguen en aumento), y se ve un intensificado protagonismo público de distintas religiones en torno a los debates  sobre las definiciones del matrimonio y la familia. El fenómeno religioso sigue siendo objeto de investigación enfocada y comparativa en un país que cuenta con  32 entidades federadas, que componen muchas regiones distintas, en las que se registran 62 lenguas indígenas, y que tienen una complicada historia de  relaciones Iglesia-Estado. La religiosidad popular que se desenvuelve en contextos cada vez más abigarrados—sociales, económicos, políticos, étnicos, y geográficos—sigue invitando a una investigación profunda, meticulosa, y rigurosa.
Las reuniones anuales de la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México (Rifrem) representan el principal foro académico de estudiosos de este fenómeno. En el transcurso de las últimas dos décadas, los miembros de esta insignia asociación han producido un impresionante corpus de investigación que genera monografías, antologías, artículos de revistas, documentales, etc. También ha servido para crear equipos de especialistas interlocutores para determinar las metodologías y las categorías en el renglón religioso  del censo nacional de población, y han presentado las encuestas más representativas sobre la religión en México. Dada la proximidad de México a los Estados Unidos y Centroamérica y la imbricación de las variables religiosas, étnicas y migratorias, los investigadores de Rifrem también han estudiado el fenómeno religioso allende la frontera (en “México de Afuera”), examinando las dimensiones transnacionales de la práctica y la identidad religiosa en los antiguos y nuevos circuitos de migración laboral, entre los migrantes centroamericanos, y dentro de las comunidades indígenas de origen y de destino (en EEUU). La dispersión geográfica se ha producido en paralelo con una creciente conciencia de la contingencia de las rúbricas y categorías de análisis importadas de los países del Norte Global; por lo tanto, Rifrem también ha servido como un sitio productivo para el replanteamiento de cuestiones teóricas y metodológicas de una realidad transversal a las fronteras nacionales.
Claremont Graduate University se complace en anunciar que será el anfitrión de la Vigésima Reunión Anual de la Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México, que se celebrará del 31 de mayo al 2 de junio de 2017 en su campus en Claremont, California (a cuarenta millas al este de la ciudad de Los Ángeles, la segunda ciudad del mundo con mayor población de mexicanos). Esta reunión histórica en el sur de California representa una valiosa oportunidad para el seguimiento de intercambio entre los gremios académicos en ambos países y en otras partes de América Latina, que tiene como antecedente el que en 2006, Rifrem celebró su décima reunión anual en el campus de Arizona State University, en Tempe, Arizona, USA.). También marca un cambio institucional de parte de CGU dirigida a la investigación y enseñanza sobre las religiones latinas y latinoamericanas.
Religión y migración
Esta fortuita convergencia institucional y académica sugiere un tema central para el Vigésimo Encuentro de Rifrem: Religión y migración en México y en México de afuera. En efecto, como se ha señalado, el tema refleja un continuo interés entre los especialistas de la Rifrem en, por ejemplo, el crecimiento transnacional y la agencia de tales minorías religiosas como son los Testigos de Jehová, Mormones, Adventistas y Pentecostales, y en el activismo transnacional de los pueblos indígenas contra los procesos neoliberales y en su defensa de usos y costumbres tradicionales. El tema también se presta para una mirada retrospectiva y crítica sobre la suerte desigual de la variable de la religión en los estudios de migración. En particular, el estudio fundacional (1926-1929) realizado por el antropólogo Manuel Gamio, indagó profundamente la cuestión de las prácticas y creencias religiosas entre los inmigrantes mexicanos en los Estados Unidos. Su obra Life Story of the Mexican Immigrant (Universidad de Chicago, 1931) tejió el hilo religioso a través de las muchas y muy variadas historias de los sujetos del estudio, mientras que su trabajo más analítico, Mexican Immigration to the United States (Universidad de Chicago, 1930) incluyó un capítulo sobre la religión. La variable también capturó la atención del traductor y cercano colaborador de Gamio, Robert Redfield. Del mismo modo y al mismo tiempo, el incipiente campo de estudios sociológicos en la University of Southern California trató de mapear el campo religioso mexicano en su región; las varias tesis supervisadas ​​por Emory Bogardus incluso lograron capturar las huellas de un pentecostalismo emergente. El eclipse de la variable de la religión en los posteriores estudios sobre la migración mexicana es comprensible, dado los parámetros disciplinarios y los supuestos ideológicos que marcaron las etapas iniciales de los estudios chicanos. La última década de investigación, sin embargo, ha arrojado nueva luz sobre la intersección de la religión y la migración, llamando la atención sobre la persistencia y la portabilidad de las identidades y prácticas religiosas entre poblaciones migratorias y sus comunidades de destino y origen. Por ejemplo, el eje que se extiende desde el istmo de Tehuantepec del Estado de Oaxaca a través de la Ciudad de México hasta el oeste de Sinaloa y estados del noroeste de Baja California y de allí a California y Oregon representa un corredor de nueva migración laboral y étnica (desde 1960), cuyos estrechos parámetros geográficos y cronológicos (en comparación a las más difusas olas migratorias anteriores) presentan oportunidades para estudios sobre la religión y migración. El examen del transnacionalismo religioso puede evaluar, entre otras cosas: la influencia de la tecnología y los medios de comunicación; factores inter-generacionales; la función catalítica y de refuerzo de las remesas monetarias y simbólicas (religiosas) y la agencia de los migrantes en sus comunidades de origen; el peso relativo de las estrategias misioneras frente a las tácticas de migrantes; las dinámicas de poder entre congregaciones atadas transnacionalmente; y el potencial de las congregaciones y parroquias latinas de servir como plazas públicas alternas para una población que ha servido como chivos expiatorios en los Estados Unidos, y, en su defecto, de servir como incubadoras de liderazgo social y político. Claramente, las religiosidades siguen jugando un papel significante en México, en la frontera, y en la articulación de tiempos simultáneos y comunidades trasnacionales, así como en la gestación de los espacios públicos alternos habitados por actores subalternos, espacios dentro de los cuales se articulan y se viven sus nociones de ciudadanía cultural. De hecho, los recientes estudios históricos han iluminado este proceso, demostrando el impacto que tuvieron los agentes mexicanos religiosos sobre la historia y evolución de las comunidades mexicano-americanas durante el largo curso del siglo XX (por ejemplo, prelados y sacerdotes cristeros exiliados en San Antonio y en Los Ángeles; ministros protestantes transnacionales; solidaridad transfronteriza pentecostal; estructuras binacionales de cooperación episcopal, apropiaciones chicanas y centroamericanas de símbolos mesoamericanos, y, por supuesto, tensiones intra-étnicas). La migración ha dejado su huella en la reconfiguración del campo religioso cristiano. Según encuestas recientes, el 23% de los estadounidenses que asisten a una iglesia son católicos romanos; los latinos constituyen el 40% de los católicos, y tienen una elevada representación dentro de la Renovación Carismática. De los 153 millones (52%) de protestantes en los EE.UU., el 7% (10 millones) son latinos, con poblaciones de origen centroamericano y puertorriqueño que demuestran tasas pentecostales significativamente más altas que las presentes entre gente de origen mexicano.
Propuestas de mesas de trabajo/mesas temáticas
En busca de fomentar el intercambio académico entre especialistas y estudiantes interesados en el análisis de los fenómenos religiosos en México, se abre la convocatoria para recibir propuestas de mesas de trabajo que se abordarán durante la XX edición del Encuentro de la Rifrem. El Comité Organizador dará la bienvenida a propuestas de mesas de trabajo (en torno al tema conductor y otros temas), que a su vez formarán la base para una segunda convocatoria de ponencias individuales. La siguiente lista de posibles temas no es exhaustiva, y puede ser considerado en enfoque comparativo:
-       Identidad étnica y religión nacional
-       Religión, migración y transnacionalismo
-       Religión y frontera
-       Religión y neoliberalismo
-       Religión y medio ambiente
-       Religión y bellas artes
-       Religión y artes plásticas
-       Religión y artes literarias
-       Religión y música
-       Religión y cine
-       Religión virtual y los milenios
-       Religión y sexo
-       Religión y violencia
-       Religión e identidades queer, intersexual y trans
-       Problemas teóricos y metodológicos
-       Teología y estudios religiosos: configuraciones institucionales
-       Laicismo y nuevos retos
-       Nuevos movimientos religiosos binacionales
-       Guadalupanismos comparativos
-       Expresiones religiosas de pachucos y cholos
-       Religiosidad y movimiento chicano
-       Apropiaciones y recreaciones mesoamericanas
-       Religiones afro-latinoamericanos
-       Identidades y experiencias religiosas centroamericanas
-       Cultos de los santos y comunidades diaspóricas
-       Conversión y apostasía
-       Religión, xenofobia, y repatriación
-       Prácticas litúrgicas, musicales y rituales
-       Identidades musulmanes
-       Conversos y mesianismos
-       Prácticas taumatúrgicas
-       Religiones “Hechas en U.S.A.” (Mormones, Adventistas, Testigos, Pentecostales)
-       Religiones “Hechas en México” (La Luz del Mundo, El Buen Pastor)
-       Quincentenario Protestante
-       Estudios congregacionales
Requisitos para presentar propuesta de mesa
1. Título de la mesa.
2. Nombre del coordinador o coordinadores.
3. Correo electrónico.
4. Institución de adscripción.
5. Resumen de mesa: Debe explicar la pertinencia y los motivos que orientan la propuesta, así como las implicaciones teóricas y metodológicas con las que se busca abonar al debate en cuestión. Su extensión máxima es de media cuartilla.
Las propuestas deberán enviarse a la dirección: rifrem2017@gmail.com
Observaciones: Por cuestiones de logística y organización del encuentro, cada mesa podrá contar con una o más sesiones de trabajo, a fin de cubrir con las necesidades y demandas requeridas. El formato de las mesas podrá incluir ponencias en español e inglés (y bilingües).
Fechas importantes
Las propuestas para mesas de trabajo deben ser enviadas a rifrem2017@gmail.com. La fecha de recepción es el 21 de noviembre de 2016. Posterior a esta fecha, el Comité Organizador Local y el Consejo de la Rifrem harán una selección de las propuestas que formarán parte del XX Encuentro, buscando incorporar tanto aquellas que estén relacionadas con la temática del mismo, como otras que sean de pertinencia y relevancia para la comunidad académica. Lo anterior, sin olvidar el cumplimiento de los criterios establecidos en la presente convocatoria.
La selección de las mesas de trabajo será publicada posteriormente en los medios oficiales de la Rifrem. Servirá para establecer los contornos de la convocatoria de propuestas de ponencia, que se publicará el 28 de Noviembre de 2016. La fecha límite para las propuestas de ponencias es 21 de diciembre de 2016. El Comité Organizador agilizará las aceptaciones oficiales de las mesas de trabajo y de las ponencias individuales, con el fin de permitir a los participantes tiempo suficiente para gestionar la expedición de visas.
Sede del encuentro, viaje, y hospedaje
Claremont Graduate University es parte del Claremont Colleges Consortium, un racimo de cinco instituciones de licenciatura y de posgrado y varios más, incluyendo un seminario, Claremont School of Theology. El Departamento de Religión forma parte integral de la Facultad de Artes y Humanidades de Claremont Graduate University. A sus enfoques históricos y fuertes en las áreas de filosofía, teología, estudios bíblicos, e historia se agrega ahora uno sobre las religiones latinas y latinoamericanas.
La Ciudad de Claremont está a pie de la Sierra de San Gabriel y colinda con varias ciudades suburbanas en el este del condado de Los Ángeles y oeste del condado de San Bernardino (Pomona, La Verne, San Dimas, Ontario, Upland, Montclair, y Rancho Cucamonga). La zona cuenta con un considerable número de hoteles con varios niveles de alojamiento, y es servido por el cercano aeropuerto internacional de Ontario. Otros aeropuertos de la región son los de Los Ángeles, Burbank, Orange County (John Wayne), Long Beach, y San Diego. Los asistentes también pueden viajar dentro de México al Aeropuerto Internacional de Tijuana con el fin de cruzar a los Estados Unidos; con lo cual se puede viajar en tren o autobús a Claremont/Pomona (generalmente a través de Los Ángeles). Los organizadores proporcionarán detalles de viajes, alojamiento, y otra información en cuanto sean éstas disponibles.
Más Información
Para más información, póngase en contacto con Haley Thomas (haley.thomas@cgu.edu) o Daniel Ramírez (daniel.ramirez@cgu.edu).

***
Call for Proposals
Claremont Graduate University and the
Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México
(Network of Religion Researchers in Mexico)
Invite thematic papers session proposals for the Twentieth Annual Meeting of Rifrem to be held, May 31, June 1 and 2, 2017 at Claremont Graduate University (Claremont, California, USA):
Religion and migration in greater Mexico
Background discussion
The long-held expectation for religion’s eclipse in the shadow of an encroaching and totalizing secularized modernity has faltered in the face of the phenomenon’s resiliency and diversification. In the case of Mexico, resilient and renewed indigenous religious traditions, resilient and new cults of saints, an expanded pluralism (including growing rates of non-Catholic and non-religious adscription), and perennial, new, and intensified public protagonism over definitions of marriage and the family continue to invite focused and comparative scholarly research in a country that is comprised of 32 federated entities, many distinct regions, that registers 62 spoken indigenous languages, and that has a complicated history of Church-State relations. Scholars are challenged to precisely analyze moving targets of popular religiosity in variegated social, economic, political, ethnic, and geographical contexts.
The premier forum for scholarly exchange concerning these and other topics has been the annual meetings of the Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México – RIFREM (Network of Religion Researchers of Mexico). Over the course of the past two decades, members of this flagship association have produced an impressive body of scholarship in monographs, edited books, journal articles, documentaries, etc. They have also served as expert interlocutors for determining methodologies and categories in the federal Census, and have produced the most authoritative surveys of religion in Mexico. Given Mexico’s proximity to the United States, Central America, and the imbrication of religious, ethnic, and migratory phenomena, RIFREM scholars have also studied religious phenomena in “greater” Mexico (México de Afuera), examining the transnational dimensions of religious practice and identity in old and new circuits of labor migration, among Central American migrants, and within indigenous communities of origin, settlement, and return. The geographical dispersion has occurred in tandem with a growing awareness of the contingency of established analytical rubrics and categories imported from the global North; thus, RIFREM has also served as a productive site for the re-thinking of theoretical and methodological questions in transnational contexts.
Claremont Graduate University is pleased to announce that it will serve as the host of the Red de Investigadores del Fenómeno Religioso en México’s Twentieth Annual Meeting, to be held May 31 through June 2, 2017, on CGU’s Claremont, California campus (forty miles east of Los Angeles, the second largest city of Mexican-origin population). This historic gathering in southern California represents a valuable opportunity for continued scholarly exchange between scholarly guilds in both countries and elsewhere in Latin America. (In 2006, RIFREM celebrated its tenth annual meeting at Arizona State University.) It also marks CGU’s institutional shift in the direction of research and teaching in Latino and Latin American religions.   
Religion and Migration in Greater Mexico
This fortuitous institutional and scholarly convergence suggests an organizing theme for RIFREM’s Twentieth Annual Meeting: Religion and Migration in Greater Mexico. Indeed, as noted, the theme reflects ongoing scholarly interest within RIFREM in, for example, the transnational growth and agency of such religious minorities as Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, Seventh-Day Adventists, and Pentecostals, and in indigenous communities’ transnational activism against neoliberal processes and their defense of traditional ways (usos y costumbres). Importantly, the theme affords an opportunity for a ninety-year critical retrospective on the uneven fate of the religion variable in migration studies. Notably, the foundational study (1926-1929) undertaken by anthropologist Manuel Gamio, queried deeply the question of religious practice and belief among Mexican immigrants in the United States. The Life Story of the Mexican Immigrant (University of Chicago, 1931) wove the religion thread throughout the myriad histories of the study’s subjects, while the more analytical volume, Mexican Immigration to the United States (University of Chicago, 1930) included a chapter on religion. The variable also captured the attention of Gamio translator and collaborator Robert Redfield. Similarly, the incipient field of sociology at the University of Southern California sought to map the religious field of Mexican Los Angeles; the several theses overseen by Emory Bogardus even managed to capture traces of an emerging Pentecostalism. The religion variable’s eclipse in subsequent scholarship on Mexican migration is understandable in light of prevailing disciplinary constraints and ideological assumptions in early Chicano/Latino Studies. The last decade of research, however, has cast new light on the intersection of religion and migration, drawing attention to the persistence and portability of religious identities and practices among migrating populations and migration-tied communities. To take just one example, the axis that runs from Oaxaca state’s Tehuantepec Isthmus through Mexico City to western Sinaloa and northwestern Baja California states and from there to California and Oregon represents an identifiable corridor of new labor migration (since 1960), “Oaxacalifornia”, whose geographic and chronological parameters (versus the more diffuse migration and settlement patterns of earlier Mexican migration waves) present opportunities for manageable and focused research on religion and migration. The study of religious transnationalism can assess, among other things: the influence of technology and media; the catalytic and reinforcing role of monetary and symbolic (religious) remittances and the agency of migrants in communities of origin; the relative weight of missionary strategies vs. migrant tactics; power relations between transnationally tied congregations; and the potential of U.S. Latino congregations and parishes to serve as alternative public squares for a population that has been increasingly criminalized and pushed out of the public arena and public institutions of the U.S., and, alternatively, to serve as incubators of social and political leadership to be leveraged and exercised in communities of origin in Mexico. Clearly, religion continues to matter in “greater” Mexico, in the borderlands, and in the alternative public spaces shaped and inhabited by subaltern actors, spaces within which they articulate notions of cultural citizenship. Indeed, recent historical scholarship has illumined this, demonstrating the longstanding force and impact of Mexican religious actors, history, and developments on Mexican American communities during the long course of the twentieth century (e.g., exilic Cristero prelates and priests in San Antonio and Los Angeles; transnational Protestant ministers; Pentecostal borderlands solidarity and culture; cooperative episcopal structures, Chicano and Central American appropriations of Mesoamerican motifs, and, of course, intra-ethnic tensions). According to recent surveys, 23% of U.S. church-goers are Roman Catholic; Latinos constitute 40% of Catholics, and are highly represented within the Charismatic Renewal. Of the 153 million (52%) Protestants in the U.S., 7% (10 million) are Latinos, with Puerto Rican and Central American-origin populations demonstrating significantly higher Pentecostal rates than Mexican-origin ones.
Call for Thematic Papers Sessions
The meeting organizers invite proposals for thematic papers sessions (around the organizing theme and other themes), which will then form the basis for a subsequent call for individual papers. The following list of possible topics is not an exhaustive one, and may be considered in comparative focus. The Organizing Committee will welcome, of course, topics in the general and broad study of the religious phenomenon.
-       National and Ethnic Identity and Religion
-       Religion, Migration and Transnationalism
-       Religion and the Borderlands
-       Religion and Neoliberalism
-       Religion and the Environment
-       Religion and Fine Arts
-       Religion, Film and Theatre
-       Religion and Gender
-       Religion and Queer, Intersexual and Trans Identities
-       Virtual Religion and Millenials
-       Religion and Sex
-       Religion and Violence
-       Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Religious Social Scientific Research
-       Theology and Religious Studies: Comparative Institutional Configurations
-       Church-State Relations and Tensions
-       Musical and Sonic Dimensions in Religion
-       New Binational Religious Movements
-       Indigenous Religious Practices
-       Comparative Guadalupanismos
-       Pachuco, Cholo, and Chicana Religious Expressions
-       Chicana/o and Centroamericana/o Mesoamerican Appropriations
-       Central American Religious Identities
-       Cults of Saints and Diasporic Communities
-       Conversion and Apostasy
-       Xenophobia, Repatriation, and Religion
-       Liturgical, Musical and Ritual Practices
-       Conversos and Messianism
-       Muslim Identities
-       Thaumaturgical Practices
-       Congregational Studies
-       Spanish-Mexican Borderlands: From Bolton to Anzaldúa
-       Protestant Quincentenary
-       “Made in the U.S.A.” Religions (Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Adventists, Pentecostals)
-       “Made in Mexico” Religions (Luz del Mundo, Buen Pastor)
Requirements
Proposals for Thematic Papers Sessions should include
1) Proposed Title
2) Name of proposer/organizer
3) Email
4) Institution
5) Description: Should include the theoretical basis and implications for the proposal and be no longer than one-half page.
Proposals should be sent rifrem2017@gmail.com.
Note: The meeting logistics may allow for several consecutive time slots for a thematic papers session, depending on the number of individual paper proposals accepted. The format of the sessions will include papers delivered in Spanish and English (or bilingual).
Key Dates
The date for receipt of thematic panels/sessions proposals is November 21, 2016. Whereupon the local organizing committee and the RIFREM steering committee will select the thematic papers sessions for the Twentieth Meeting, choosing sessions that reflect the conference organizing theme as well as other themes of interest to the academic community. These will serve to establish the contours of a subsequent (second) Call for Proposals for individual papers, to be issued on November 28, 2016. The due date for the individual papers is December 21, 2016. The Organizing Committee will expedite official acceptances of the thematic papers sessions and individual papers, in order to allow participants sufficient time to secure U.S. travel visas.
Conference Site, Accommodations, Travel, etc.
Claremont Graduate University is a member of the Claremont Colleges Consortium, a cluster of five undergraduate colleges and several graduate ones, including a seminary, the Claremont School of Theology. CGU’s School of Arts and Humanities houses the University’s Religion Department, a unit with strengths in the areas of Philosophy, Theology, Biblical Studies, History, Women’s Studies, American Religion, Mormon Studies, and a new focus on Latino and Latin American Religions.
The City of Claremont is nestled beneath the San Gabriel mountain range and adjoins several suburban cities in eastern Los Angeles and western San Bernardino counties (Pomona, La Verne, San Dimas, Ontario, Upland, Montclair, and Rancho Cucamonga). The area counts a considerable number of hotels with several levels of accommodations, and is served by the nearby Ontario International Airport. Other regional airports include Los Angeles International Airport, Burbank International Airport, John Wayne Airport (Orange County), and San Diego International Airport. Attendees can also travel within Mexico to the Tijuana International Airport in order to cross over into the United States; whereupon they can travel by rail or bus to Claremont (generally via Los Angeles). The organizers will provide detailed travel, lodging, and other information, as this becomes available.
Further Information
For further information, please contact Haley Thomas (haley.thomas@cgu.edu) or Daniel Ramírez (daniel.ramirez@cgu.edu). 
Comité Organizador 
Coordinadores Generales
Dr. Daniel Ramírez (CGU)
Lic. Haley Thomas (CGU)
Comité de recepción de trabajos
Mtro. Felipe Agredano (East Los Angeles College)
Dr. Lloyd Barba (Williams College)
Comité de organización logística y enlace regional
Melissa Fitzpatrick (CGU)
Mtra. Milca Montañez (Fuller Theological Seminary)
Mtro. Felipe Agredano (East Los Angeles College)
Mtro. Jesús Martínez (University of California Santa Cruz)
Lic. Annette Cortez
María Palacios
Consejo de la Rifrem
Renée de la Torre (Ciesas, Occidente)
Cristina Gutiérrez Zuñiga (Coljal)
Alberto Hernández (Colef)
Antonio Higuera Bonfil (UQRoo)
Luis Rodolfo Morán (UdeG)
María Eugenia Patiño (UAA)
Genaro Zalpa (UAA)
Olga Odgers (Colef)
Carlos Garma (UAM, Iztapalapa)
Ariel Corpus (UNAM)
Patricia Fortuny (Ciesas, Peninsular)
Nahayeilli Juárez Huet (Ciesas, Peninsular)
Luis Jesús Martínez (UATx)